Acharya Prashant: When you don’t give the world importance, it simply vanishes

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Listener 1: Acharya Ji, when I woke up today in the morning, I was afraid, I didn’t know why…

Listener 2: Earlier when I used to come for camps, I never felt like reading, but this time I wanted to read more and more and more.

Acharya Prashant: Whatever you feel, learn how to not to give it importance. Your knowledge will not help you, your mind, its content, all these readings, nothing will help you. What will help you is this: so many things will keep happening, learn to not to give them importance.

So, if you woke up and you found out that you were afraid, is it really worth mentioning?

Learn to call this not as reflection but as gossip!

If ‘n’ things happen with you, I assure you that ‘5n’ things happen with me and they are not very sacred and beautiful things. Just that I have learned to not to give them importance. I keep doing what I have to do even when a thousand other things are happening.

I know what I have to do being what I am, all this dance of this and that keeps happening. I avoid giving it importance, body will say a few things, the mind will be afraid, thoughts of this and that will keep coming, why should they be called important?

L: I guess, the more we give importance to something the more thoughts it generates.

AP: But it’s a feeling of great power.

You know something is hurting and you are still walking. You know the mind is sad, it is almost feeling like crying out, and you are still speaking in a meditative way. It’s a feeling of, ‘You cannot touch me. I cannot be defeated.’

You think of a man, a crowd is beating him up black and blue, blows are landing on his face, on his chest, on his back, and he is still reciting a shlok, think of it, not that he is not experiencing the blow, not that pain is not arising; but he knows what is important; after a while he simply forgets.

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Why does it appear that good people suffer and the evil keep enjoying?

Question: Acharya Ji, why do good people always suffer the most in their lives and evil people enjoy the most in their lives?

Acharya Prashant: What’s your name?

Questioner: Rachit

AP: Rachit is saying, “Why do good people suffer and why do bad people enjoy?”

Rachit, if you are suffering, that itself is proof enough that you are quite bad!

It has been clearly realised, that suffering is sin. The only sin is to suffer.

Let’s understand why:

What is it that gets hurt and suffers?

Listener: Mind

AP: What in the mind gets hurt and suffers?

You see, there is a beautiful Zen saying, it says, ‘You cannot drive a nail into empty space.’

To drive a nail, what do you need?

A wall.

When you drive a nail into the wall, the wall will get hurt. It is impossible to drive a nail into it, without hurting it. Similarly, if you are empty of conditioning, nobody can drive a nail into you. You get hurt, you suffer, because you have a rigid wall of beliefs. When those beliefs are shaken, then you suffer. That wall, is a wall of beliefs. That’s why, the really good man — because you talked in the language of good and bad, so I am borrowing it from you — never suffers. He does not have the capacity to suffer. He can have pain.

You know, once a man like that, met an accident; he was asked,

‘How are you?’

He said, ‘Wounded, but not hurt.Wounds are alright; situations can give me wounds but nothing can hurt me; because to be hurt, you require a particular wall, I don’t have that wall, so nothing can hurt me; I never suffer. Even in the deepest pain, I don’t suffer. I experience the pain, there is no doubt about it. If you cut my leg-off, then I will experience pain, but even that pain will not touch my innermost point, I will not suffer.’

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Individuality is neither acquired nor influenced

Question: My beliefs have come out of my experiences and my experiences have shaped my individuality. If I give up my beliefs, then I am giving up on my individuality?

Acharya Prashant: (quoting the questioner) My beliefs have come out of my experiences and my experiences have shaped my individuality. If I give up my beliefs, then I am giving up on my individuality?

If I ask you to write down what I just said in the last fifteen-twenty minutes and I say, write down in three clear points what has been said. And you write it down. And then I say, compare it with your neighbor, what he or she has written. You will be deeply surprised. You will be deeply surprised at the variation. You will look at your neighbors’ sheet and say, did he ever say this? What have you written?

Now I am one and I am saying the same thing, but all of you are experiencing different things. What is this experience? Where does it come from?

What is an experience?

Experience is nothing but the experiencer.

Kindly do not think that the experience is factual, that experience has any objective reality to it. You only experience what you have been conditioned to experience. Take a clear example. Even as we speak right now, a cricket match is going on. India versus England, right? Suppose we project the game here, live. On this side are Indians and on this side are Englishmen. And India quickly loses three wickets. What does this side experience? Gloom, disaster, three wickets in two overs, long faces. What does this side experience (pointing to the other side)? Cheerfulness, enthusiasm, right? Same happening, different experiences. Now, can these people call their experience as my own experience? Are ‘you’ experiencing it? Or is the ‘Indian’ experiencing it? Similarly, can these people call the cheerfulness their own experience? Are they experiencing it? Or is the Englishman experiencing it?

You do not experience anything! You are the experiencer who is a bundle of his
conditioning.

Born in England, you would be experiencing something totally different. You would be sitting on this side, same happening and you would be feeling glad. Are you getting it?
Listener: Acharya Ji, what is the experience

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On Jesus Christ: How to be free of envy and jealousy?


May 2018 TL_Poster 13

“Heart at peace gives life to the body but envy rots the bones.”

BIBLE (PROVERBS 14:30)

Acharya Prashant:

Shilpi is asking:

Namaste Acharya Ji,

The bible says “Heart at peace gives life to the body but envy rots the bones”. I see that I’m stricken with jealousy or envy for my fellow co-workers, or people I hear about in the media, sometimes even friends, as I feel like they have something I don’t. It is very draining and disturbing and I do not want to focus on this anymore. Please guide me away from this trait.

Thank you.

Shilpi, when you are alright with yourself then the way your energy flows towards others, your attitude towards others, your relationship with others, is called as Love. When you are not alright with yourself then your attitude towards others, the way your energy flows towards others, is called as envy or desire.

If you are envious that somebody has something, then rest assured, you too desire that something. So, envy and desire go together.

Unless the other has something that you too are desirous of, you won’t feel any envy.

So, the question is not about how you feel towards others. It’s not about your coworkers or the people been talked of in the media. The question fundamentally is about your relationship with yourself. When you are great with yourself, then to others you have only Love to offer, and when you are not alright with yourself, then to others you offer all the vitriol that is consuming your life. How to have envy-free relation with others? By having ignorance free relation with oneself.

The more you look at yourself in erroneous ways, the more you will be compelled to look at the world as the provider of a sucker, or as a threat to your identities and comforts. No feeling of any kind is to be promoted. I am not qualifying my statement by saying that feelings of littleness or envy or loneliness or incompleteness are to be selectively discouraged. I am saying no feeling of any kind is to be fueled.

Are you getting it?

No feeling of any kind.

All feelings are fundamentally feeling of incompleteness, of completeness, there is no feeling.

Completeness is a different entity altogether. It comes to you but not as a feeling. If I switch off all the lights in this room you will stop seeing me. When the light is switched on you’ll start seeing me. Does that mean that I have emerged from the tube light? Think of it. All the lights are switched off and you do not see me, and then you go to the button, you switch something on and I appear. Why can’t you say that I have sprung up from the switchboard, or dropped down from the tube light? Why can’t you say that? That’s the thing with completeness.

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On Jesus Christ: Why is Jesus asking to hate one’s life?

Poster 5

“If anyone comes to me and doesn’t hate his

brother, father, wife and children and

his own life, he cannot be my disciple.”

BIBLE (LUKE 14, VERSE 26-27)

 

Acharya Prashant:

Question says:

Jesus said, “If anyone comes to me and doesn’t hate his brother, father, wife and children and his own life, he cannot be my disciple”. What does this mean? Because it seems something opposite to what I have been hearing all my life.

Thanks.

I’ll repeat the verse quoted.

Luke 14, Verse 26-27, Jesus is saying “If anyone comes to me and doesn’t hate his brother, father, wife and children and his own life, he cannot be my disciple”.

Turbulent and choppy, hmm? But we’ll sail through it. “If anyone comes to me and doesn’t hate his brother, mother, father, wife and children and his own life,” you must read the series of the names backward — my own life, my children, my wife, my father, my mother, my brother. So what comes first in the list of those that Jesus says deserve to be hated? One’s own life. Jesus says, look at your life and see the kind of relationships you have established with your children, with your father, brother, mother, wife. And unless you are totally dissatisfied, how can you be my disciple? If you feel alright with the way you are, with the way relationships exist in the world, then remain satisfied then you need no improvement, and I’m not available to entertain you. I do not treat those who are not convinced of their sickness.

We live in relationships. A man never exists and a silo. You are always with somebody.

Aloneness is an elusive mirage for mankind.

Real aloneness is a prerogative only of the Buddhas.

The others, they all live in mandatory relationship. I’m saying mandatory because they have brought themselves to a point where they cannot be alone.

We are always related.

We always find our identity in the other through the other.

As you’re sitting here, you are related to the cold. As you are sitting here, your identity is being defined even by whether you have taken a bath today or not. Have you seen how your clothes define your identity? Every single thing that you are in contact with, starts defining you.

We exist as someone with respect to something or somebody or this or that, that is not the best way of existing, but that’s the de-facto mode of our existence.

We cannot deny that.

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On Jesus Christ: Lover at heart; disciple from mind

Poster 5

The fear of the Lord adds length to life

but the years of the wicked are cut short.

BIBLE (PROVERBS 10:27)

Acharya Prashant:

“The fear of the Lord adds length to life but the years of the wicked are cut short.”

BIBLE (PROVERBS 10:27)

Nimisha has quoted from the bible “The fear of the Lord adds length to life but the years of the wicked are cut short”.

Then she says:

Dear Acharya Ji Pranam, having studied in a convent school, I was exposed daily to the teachings of Lord Jesus and stories from the Bible from a very young age. It didn’t take me long to fall in love with the Christ. His warm compassionate gaze and loving demeanor were so comforting. However, one thing that tainted this was the continual reminder that we are all out of sin and need to repent and fear God as well as feel guilty about Christ’s crucifixion. That we are incomplete and need him to redeem us. Something within me rejects this theory of incompleteness. Why do we need to fear the Lord? Why can’t we love him unabashedly?

Thank you.

Nimisha you’ve written that something within you rejects this theory of incompleteness. Look into this statement carefully. Something within you rejects this theory of incompleteness that something, as you say, is within you that something is not the whole of you as you are. That something might be your heart, might be your core, but you are not always and fully abiding as the heart, as the core. Otherwise you would have written ‘I reject this theory of incompleteness’. No, you don’t fully reject it, and that is why this incompleteness is something that we must not turn our backs to. This incompleteness is not something to be swept under the carpet. This incompleteness has to be talked about. It has to be addressed. It has to be healed. We are strongly identified with the ego, with the incompleteness. We live as that.

When you say that in the convent school there were continuous reminders that man is born out of sin and needs to repent, and fear God and feel guilty, it is very much all right. The assertion is well placed. The one who is being referred to is indeed born out of sin.

Who are we?

Limited beings with their limited desires, limited scope, limited understanding, limited vision.

The limitation itself is the sin.

And man is born limited. Would you deny that? Man is born limited, the limitation itself is the sin. Christianity asks man to repent. The word repent is quite subtle with meaning. It means to go back, to return to home. As man is born, man is born as a wanderer, as a homeless recluse.

Somebody who has a continuous thirst to return to the home. But the thirst finds expression in a million ways except the direct way. And that is why repentance is very useful as a tool because it helps man remember that he is indeed incomplete as he is.

There is no point talking of completeness as an abstraction. There is no point talking of completeness as a concept and believing in it. Look at mankind, look at the daily life of man. Do we live in a sense of fulfillment? Every sense, every feeling, every thought that we have is a thought of incompleteness. We want more, and we want to get rid of stuff that we do not want.

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On Jesus: What does it take to believe in miracles?

Poster 5

Acharya Prashant: The next question says:

Dear Acharya Ji, Pranam

After reading the story of Lazarus, this is what comes to the mind. We all want to see miracles in order to believe in the existence of a God. Something that is magical or out of the ordinary. Most of us have witnessed those moments at some point in our lives. Yet those moments pass and we go on with our normal lives as if nothing has happened. So what does it then take to believe fully and completely? And why do we find it so difficult?

‘Miracles’ are continuously happening Nimisha. But to whom are the miracles happening? Who would perceive the miracles as happening? The one who is to perceive is lost in the gross material. He can perceive nothing but that which is loud, sensory, material.

The subtle can be perceived only by the subtle.

That is the reason why blunt demonstrations like the one in the case of Lazarus are talked of. That Lazarus loved Jesus was in itself the highest miracle. But that miracle would not be appreciated. It would not even be called a miracle because we are gross people. We have lost the sensitivity, the receptivity to perceive, record, register the little, the faint, the delicate and that is the reason why we talk only of some miracles. We do not talk of a continuity of miracles.

We talk as if miracles happen sometimes.

‘Time’ itself is a miracle.

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