Your victories will not bring you joy.

Godliness and joy are to be surrendered to, not fought up to. Your victories will not bring you joy. If your victories are bringing you joy, then it is a very shallow and tiny joy. You have earned it. You have won it. It is the result of your efforts. It cannot be bigger than you.

Man lives in duality. Man finds it comfortable to think that there are things and there are opposites of things. Such thinking enables all definitions. Because to define anything is to limit it. To limit something is to create two – a thing and it’s opposite. That is what all definition does, ‘De-fine’ – To make something finite. Obviously the infinite escapes all definition. And that’s where we start struggling. That’s where we start feeling strangulated. Are you getting it?

We start asking, “How is it possible that there is something in victory and also in the opposite of victory, defeat?” The answer is obvious, that has to be something that has nothing to do with defeat or with victory. That something has to be simply unconditional, irrespective of everything. It is unconditional of your efforts, it is unconditional with respect to the result of the effort, it is also irrespective of your response to the result. One has to live that deeply.



Read the complete article: Joy that remains untouched by defeat

Joy that remains untouched by defeat

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“Defeat, my Defeat, my solitude and my aloofness;

You are dearer to me than a thousand triumphs,

And sweeter to my heart than all world-glory. “

~Khalil Gibran

Acharya Prashant: The question is, “How can defeat be sweet? How can there be joy in being shunned and scorned?”

There is no particular glory or joy in defeat. In fact, the moment one looks for glory or joy in particular events or happenings, joy has been constrained, localized, and hence lost.

The poet here is talking of defeat because man has taken defeat as abhorrent. Victory is likable, defeat is to be avoided and shunned. Victory is likable because man associates joy with victory, and the loss of joy with defeat. Whenever joy is thus made conditional, it is certain that there is no joy in defeat, and there is also no joy in victory. And when joy there is, joy remains equally in victory and in defeat.

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Shut Up

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Question: Sir, how to judge what is valuable?

Acharya Prashant: You said, “Sir, how to judge what is valuable?” How sure are you of your judgement? Behind every judgement, (there) is someone who judges. How sure are you of that judge? Is he reliable? Or is he someone who has a tendency to modify, even reverse his own judgements? Is he someone whose judgements stand the test of time and changing conditions? Or is he someone who often mistakes in judging?

You have trusted your inner judge since long. You have lent upon so many other books, authorities and teachers. But ultimately, it is your internal teacher you depend the most upon. Let’s judge that judge.

You are asking, “How to judge what is valuable?” Let’s judge the one who will judge this! How secure have your judgements made you feel so far? How does the inner judge decide? Does he have an inner yardstick to measure; an innate source from where to know? Or do his judgements keep changing as his knowledge keeps changing? What have you observed? Continue reading